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Slargeball!
Miniatures Rules for the National Sport of Irvania

Draft Rules 2: 8/20/2001
Part 4

Flinging and the Fling Phase

Any figure that is carrying a slargeball during the Fling phase may attempt to Fling the ball. In order to be carrying the ball, the figure must have Nabbed the ball during an earlier turn, either by picking up a groundball or Nabbing (catching) a thrown airball.

The term "Flinging" in this game refers to any form of throwing, kicking, heading, nudging, batting, or any form of projecting a ball from a figure to anywhere else.

Range: A figure may Fling the ball out to a range equal to his Fling stat multiplied by 3, in inches. For instance, a Rushing Grelker with a Fling stat of 3 would be able to hurl a slargeball up to 9 inches away.

Procedure: To Fling, the figure carrying the ball chooses an exact spot on the field where the player wants the ball to land. This spot can be the base of another figure, or just an empty spot anywhere in the field (including a Goal Zone or Goal Bunker). The figure doing the Flinging must roll its Fling stat or less on 1d6. If this roll is successful, the ball lands exactly where the Flinging player wanted it to go. (See the section on Nabbing.) If this roll is unsuccessful, the ball scatters in a random direction and lands somewhere unintended.

Scatter: When a ball scatters in a random direction, you have to determine the direction it scatters and the distance it flies before falling to the ground. If you have "arrow" dice (6-sided dice with pointers on them instead of the regular spots for 1 through 6; also called "scatter" or "direction" dice) by all means, use them to determine scatter direction. If you don't have these dice, use the Scatter Diagram above to determine which way a ball goes when it scatters.

To determine the distance the scattered ball flies, subtract the number rolled on the failed Fling attempt from the Flinger's Fling stat. Roll that number of six-sided dice and add the results to find how far the ball scatters, in inches. For instance, a Captain has a Fling stat of 4. If he rolls 1 through 4 on his Fling attempt roll, the ball lands exactly where he wants it to land. If he rolls a 5, he has to roll 1d6 to find out how many inches away the ball lands from his intended target point. If he rolls a 6, he has to roll 2d6 to find out how far away the ball lands.

Note that, through scatter, the ball may land farther away than the flinger's normal range of his Fling stat multiplied by 3 inches.

Note also that Flinging and Nabbing are not simultaneous. Flinging and Nabbing take place at different times during the turn, regardless of how far the ball travels. Flinging can only take place during the Fling phase.


This particular photo, from an actual game like most of the others in these web pages, was taken at the end of the Movement Phase. The groundball in the center of the photo is surrounded by two green team and three blue team figures, and several other figures in base-to-base contact. Whappage happens next. Those figures still standing after the Whap Phase will be able to attempt to Nab the ball, starting with the figure who has the highest Nab stat (in this case the green Nickelback with the hat, who has a Nab stat of 4) and going down until someone successfully Nabs the ball. If no one Nabs the ball, it stays right there until next turn and the carnage continues as the slumbering bodies pile up. Note that none of these figures could Fling the ball during this turn, as none of the figures is currently carrying the ball.

A ball that is Flung always comes down during the beginning of the Nab phase of the same turn in which it is Flung. Because of this, airballs can only exist in the period of time between the Fling phase and the Nab phase of the same turn. Airballs cannot exist during the Check for Consciousness, Move, or Whap phases. Groundballs, on the other hand, can exist anytime they feel like it.

A figure may Fling a ball at another figure it is in base-to-base contact with, but this still requires a successful Fling roll on the part of the flinger, a successful Nab roll on the part of the flingee, and a Ballbonk roll in the event of an unsuccessful Nab attempt. Slargeballs are so dangerous that they can cause Ballbonk even when handed carefully from one person to another.

Scoring: A ball that is successfully Flung into a Goal Bunker, or scatters into a Goal Bunker, scores one point for the team whose Goal Bunker it isn't.

Coaches: In the unlikely event that a Coach is ever carrying a ball, the Coach will Fling the ball in a random direction as soon as possible (the next occurring Fling phase). If this happens, roll 2d6 to determine the number of inches away the ball lands.

Nabbing, the Nab Phase, and Ballbonk

In this game, the term "Nabbing" refers to one of two actions:

  1. the act of picking up a slargeball that is laying on the ground (a "groundball"). There is no penalty for failure of this act.
  2. the act of catching a slargeball as it falls to the ground after flying through the air (an "airball") as the result of a Fling. The penalty for failure of this act is the possibility of Ballbonk.

Nabbing a groundball: The figure attempting to Nab a groundball must be in base-to-base contact with the ball. The figure must roll its Nab stat or less on 1d6. If this roll is successful, the figure is "carrying" the ball, or "has custody" of the ball. Place the ball on top of the carrying figure's base to signify this. If this roll is unsuccessful, nothing happens.

If more than one figure are in base-to-base contact with the groundball, the figure with the highest Nab stat makes the attempt to Nab first. If this figure fails, the figure with the next highest Nab stat tries next, and so on, until a figure successfully Nabs the ball. In case of ties in the Nab stats, the team with initiative goes first. If the ties are between figures on the same team, the person controlling the figures decides which to resolve first.

If no figure is successful in Nabbing the ball, it stays there on the ground until the next turn's Nab attempts.

Coaches will never attempt to Nab a groundball. Their attentions lie elsewhere.

Nabbing an airball: If a Flung airball comes down (either by a successful Fling roll or by scatter) on any part of the base of a figure, that figure must make a Nab attept. The figure must roll its Nab stat or less on 1d6. If this roll is successful, the figure is "carrying" the ball, or "has custody" of the ball. Place the ball on top of the carrying figure's base to signify this. If this roll is unsuccessful, the figure must check for Ballbonk.

A Coach will attempt to Nab an airball if it happens to be coming their way, but will never divert their course during the Movement Phase in order to go for an airball.

Ballbonk: Slargeballs are large, dense, and incredibly dangerous. The Irvanians tell stories about knocking out Tiger tanks in WWII with slargeballs (although no one else believes these stories). Whenever an airball lands in the same spot occupied by a figure and that figure fails a Nab attempt, the figure must check for Ballbonk. Roll 1d6. If the result is 4 or less, the figure is knocked unconscious.

If any other figures (on either team) are in base-to-base contact with a figure who fails a Nab attempt and who is knocked unconscious via Ballbonk, these other figures must also attept to Nab the ball, and must check for Ballbonk if they fail the Nab attempt. Start with the figure with the highest Nab stat and work down to the lowest Nab stat, as above. If all the figures who were in base-to-base contact with the original Ballbonk victim are knocked unconscious, continue checking all figures who are in base-to-base contact with them. This process continues until a figure has successful Nabbed the ball, or all the figures who were in the entire cluster of figures who were in base-to-base contact with each other are Ballbonked. If this second possibility occurs, roll for scatter to see in which direction and how far (roll 2d6 for distance) the ball goes after all figures in the original group are Ballbonked. Slargeballs are known for bouncing a lot, and causing great damage wherever they hit the ground.

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Last updated: June 11, 2016